USS North Carolina

On our first free morning, we visited USS North Carolina.  She rests in an imposing style on the western shore of the Cape Fear River across from Wilmington.  Launched in 1940 at the Brooklyn Navy Yard, she was the fourth warship named North Carolina.  She participated in every major naval offensive in the Pacific during WWII.  In fighting off Guadalcanal, she was hit by a torpedo from a Japanese submarine.  Here are her 16″ guns on the aft deck.

USS North Carolina

USS North Carolina

And the view from the bow.

USS North Carolina

USS North Carolina

The 16″ guns fired shells using 6 sacks of powder weighing 90lbs each.  Here are the powder canisters.

Powder Casks, USS North Carolina

Powder Casks, USS North Carolina

She had twin rudders which gave her greater maneuverability and some redundancy.  The rudder stocks are huge as are the hydraulic powered steering apparatus.

Starboard rudder stock, USS North Carolina.

Starboard rudder stock, USS North Carolina.

She carried a complement of over 2,300 men.  So, you can imagine that the ship has most of what you would expect to remain self-sufficient.  Some in our party were enthralled by the cooking and baking gear.

Galley, USS North Carolina

Galley, USS North Carolina

That doesn’t mean that they weren’t interested in the armament.  Baker one minute, gunner the next…

40 mm antiaircraft guns

40 mm antiaircraft guns

We examined her ground tackle, but decided that Roxy’s recent stellar performance in the Bight of Acklins proved that she should keep the job.

Anchor, USS North Carolina

Anchor, USS North Carolina

And, it isn’t just USS North Carolina that looks fierce here.  Look who was patrolling the waters around the ship.

Alligator, USS North Carolina

Alligator, USS North Carolina

 

 

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2 Responses to USS North Carolina

  1. Gail Stracka says:

    Hi Leonards,
    If I remember correctly from when we were at the North Carolina, the alligator is named Charlie.
    We are anxious for your return.
    Safe sailing,
    God bless,
    Gail

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