New York to the Corsica River, MD in pictures

We had a good, but light air and mainly upwind passage from Port Washington to New York.  The sights along the way are great.  One of the first sights in the East River is the Boat and Breakfast across from Riker’s Island.  Of course, it’s an extended stay B&B.

Prison Barge

Prison Barge

The skyline is fabulous.  Here is midtown.

Midtown Manhattan

Midtown Manhattan

The tall ship Peking still rests proudly at the South Street Seaport.  We don’t understand why there isn’t more support to keep her here in NY.

Peking, South Street Seaport

Peking, South Street Seaport

Then, if you have a moment to look around instead of at the traffic, the view of southern Manhattan is breathtaking.

Southern Manhattan.  Goodbye New York harbor, hello Atlantic.

Southern Manhattan. Goodbye New York harbor, hello Atlantic.

Statue of Liberty, New York Harbor

Statue of Liberty, New York Harbor

For our dinner offshore, we had leftover NY coal-fired pizza from Salvatore’s.

Dinner.  Headed south off New Jersey

Dinner. Headed south off New Jersey

The waters around Cape May offer two routes into the Delaware Bay:  the middle of the mouth or what we call the “beach run” that takes you between Prissywicks shoal and Eph Shoal.  Basically you run to the beach until you can see the whites of the eyes of the folk on the beach.  Here’s the view a bit into the bay and away from the beach.

Cape May into the Delaware

Cape May into the Delaware

The channel up the Delaware bay is narrow and gives great views of ships.  We actually had plenty of room on this little guy.

Krasnodar, headed up the Delaware Bay.  Now that's an anchor.

Krasnodar, headed up the Delaware Bay. Now that’s an anchor.

By the time we were up into the Delaware River, night had fallen.  Just before the C&D canal, we saw SV Benevento on AIS and had a fun chat on the radio.  They were headed to NYC.  We last saw them in Warderick Wells in the Exumas.  What a nice coincidence.

The C&D canal is easy enough to follow.  Just stay between the orangey lights.  And stay to the side when the tugs and ships are passing.

C&D Canal.

C&D Canal.

Transiting the canal wasn’t without excitement as the railroad bridge announced that they would close in 30 minutes when we were 27 minutes away.  We hailed them on the radio and they said they would stay open for us.  Here’s the railroad bridge nice and open:

C&D Railroad bridge

C&D Railroad bridge

We made it to the Corsica a bit tired, but otherwise in fine shape.

Hurrah at anchor in the Corsica river, MD

Hurrah at anchor in the Corsica river, MD

 

Advertisements
This entry was posted in Maryland, New York and tagged , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

One Response to New York to the Corsica River, MD in pictures

  1. John Cooke says:

    Interesting view from the water. I always get nervous when deep drafters go around out front. The Rips as we call them are so shallow and rough at low tide. I wonder if you remember how much water under bottom when you made the turn?

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s