New York to the Corsica River, MD in pictures

We had a good, but light air and mainly upwind passage from Port Washington to New York.  The sights along the way are great.  One of the first sights in the East River is the Boat and Breakfast across from Riker’s Island.  Of course, it’s an extended stay B&B.

Prison Barge

Prison Barge

The skyline is fabulous.  Here is midtown.

Midtown Manhattan

Midtown Manhattan

The tall ship Peking still rests proudly at the South Street Seaport.  We don’t understand why there isn’t more support to keep her here in NY.

Peking, South Street Seaport

Peking, South Street Seaport

Then, if you have a moment to look around instead of at the traffic, the view of southern Manhattan is breathtaking.

Southern Manhattan.  Goodbye New York harbor, hello Atlantic.

Southern Manhattan. Goodbye New York harbor, hello Atlantic.

Statue of Liberty, New York Harbor

Statue of Liberty, New York Harbor

For our dinner offshore, we had leftover NY coal-fired pizza from Salvatore’s.

Dinner.  Headed south off New Jersey

Dinner. Headed south off New Jersey

The waters around Cape May offer two routes into the Delaware Bay:  the middle of the mouth or what we call the “beach run” that takes you between Prissywicks shoal and Eph Shoal.  Basically you run to the beach until you can see the whites of the eyes of the folk on the beach.  Here’s the view a bit into the bay and away from the beach.

Cape May into the Delaware

Cape May into the Delaware

The channel up the Delaware bay is narrow and gives great views of ships.  We actually had plenty of room on this little guy.

Krasnodar, headed up the Delaware Bay.  Now that's an anchor.

Krasnodar, headed up the Delaware Bay. Now that’s an anchor.

By the time we were up into the Delaware River, night had fallen.  Just before the C&D canal, we saw SV Benevento on AIS and had a fun chat on the radio.  They were headed to NYC.  We last saw them in Warderick Wells in the Exumas.  What a nice coincidence.

The C&D canal is easy enough to follow.  Just stay between the orangey lights.  And stay to the side when the tugs and ships are passing.

C&D Canal.

C&D Canal.

Transiting the canal wasn’t without excitement as the railroad bridge announced that they would close in 30 minutes when we were 27 minutes away.  We hailed them on the radio and they said they would stay open for us.  Here’s the railroad bridge nice and open:

C&D Railroad bridge

C&D Railroad bridge

We made it to the Corsica a bit tired, but otherwise in fine shape.

Hurrah at anchor in the Corsica river, MD

Hurrah at anchor in the Corsica river, MD

 

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Fishing in Maryland

If you fish in Maryland without a license, they may suspend your license.

Rules, rules everywhere

Rules, rules everywhere

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Bay Bridge astern

Headed for the Wye river where we stared this trip 14 months ago.

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Delaware Bay

Here’s the view of Brandywine Shoal light, the first of several colorfully named shoals and lights that mark the progression up the Delaware.

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Here’s the view of the wind:

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Other than the wind speed, this has been the wind theme of the trip. Still, we are making good time and all is well aboard the good ship Hurrah.

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Past Manhattan

Bound for Maryland via Cape May.

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Fishing, pizza, and a puzzle in Port Washington

Our hunt for the elusive New England fluke finally found success today.  Off the boat, we caught two keeper fluke (20″ and 21″). We caught them on fluke rigs tipped with squid.  Tracy also caught two smaller unidentified fish that are feeding like crazy at the surface all around the boat.

Fluke (aka Summer flounder) at Port Washington

Fluke (aka Summer flounder) at Port Washington

Of course, we also returned to Salvatore’s coal fired pizza.  Twice.  For four pizzas total.  Yum.  We tried something different with this pepperoni and meatball.  It was great, but the sausage is still amazing.

Meatball and pepperoni pizza at Salvatore's

Meatball and pepperoni pizza at Salvatore’s

But, rest assured that it’s not all pulling up fish and eating pizza (oh, and ice cream) here.  No, we have a puzzle.  The pesky bilge pump worked it’s way over the handle to open the hatch to the propane locker and effectively lock it closed.  And, as many of you know, the propane locker is completely sealed to the inside of the boat (to keep the propane out of the boat), so there isn’t another way in.  Hmmm.

How did the hand-held bilge pump work it's way over the handle to open the hatch?

How did the hand-held bilge pump (blue) work it’s way over the handle to open the hatch?

Now the front that diverted us here (rather than taking the easier offshore route) has passed.  We’re off tomorrow (Thursday) around lunch time headed for Maryland via New York Harbor and the Delaware Bay.

 

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Whales, birds, and Supermoons

We have had two good days of long day passages under motor (we never saw winds above 5 knots).  We left Cape Elizabeth /Richmond Island at 0500 bound for Gloucester, but made good time early on and decided to head for Provincetown instead.  Along the way, we passed over Jeffrey’s Ledge and Stellwagen Bank, two great places for sea life.  We saw a huge pod of common dolphins, many birds, two sharks (we think small basking sharks) drifting on the surface, a few blows in the distance, and as we approached Provincetown, several finback whales, the second largest animal on the planet.  They are stunning.

Finback whale, Cape Cod, 9 August 2014

Finback whale, Cape Cod, 9 August 2014

 

finback whales, Cape Cod

finback whales, Cape Cod

We also enjoyed seeing the supermoon.  Here’s the moonrise over Cape Cod:

Supermoon over Cape Cod, 9 Aug, 2014

Supermoon over Cape Cod, 9 Aug, 2014

Here’s the moonset from Provincetown harbor.

Supermoon setting, Provincetown harbor, 10 August.

Supermoon setting, Provincetown harbor, 10 August.

Anyone out there know how to tell which picture was morning and which was evening other than looking it up or remembering from this specific day?

From Provincetown we hauled up the anchor at 0500 again and headed around the tip of Cape Cod for a few hours of whale and bird watching.  Yes, we can’t miss any opportunity to see whales again.  We saw several fin back whales again, a gray seal and many shearwaters. By 0830 we were on our way to the Cape Cod Canal and Cuttyhunk. The run through the canal was some of the roughest water we have seen in a while. We had a seemingly endless parade of powerboats heading against the current pushing creating steep, confused waves. We buried the bow in one and took water all the way into the cockpit and down the companionway. So much for the no wake zones.

The summer weekend trend continued at Cuttyhunk with more boats than we have ever seen here. Of course, everyone was in a rush to elbow their way into a spot. We anchored in the outer harbor at the edge of the anchorage and away from the chaos.  Can you spot us in the picture below?

Cuttyhunk.  Hurrah is in the outer anchorage.  The lone dark-hulled sailboat in the outer anchorage in the picture.

Cuttyhunk. Hurrah is in the outer anchorage. The lone dark-hulled sailboat in the outer anchorage in the picture.

The inner harbor was even more packed with boats rafted on many of the moorings that fill the harbor. Here’s the “skyline” of the inner harbor from our anchorage.

Cuttyhunk skyline.  11 August, 2014

Cuttyhunk skyline. 11 August, 2014

Our 1958 edition of the Duncan cruising guide notes:

“Before World War II, four large red and white mooring buoys were available to visiting yachtsmen when not in use. During the war, these were removed, but they may be put out again. At the present writing, there are no town moorings available.” What a different scene it must have been in those days.  Cuttyhunk was also famous for striped bass fishing.  We loved this sign:

A relic from the famous striped bass fishing days?

A relic from the famous striped bass fishing days?

 

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